uppskrift fyrir rúgbrauð/recipe for sweet icelandic rye bread

After my last post, I had a couple requests for my rúgbrauð recipe, so here it is, with the disclaimer that I’ve only made it once and there is undoubtedly room for improvement.  If you try it, make sure you leave a comment and let me know how it turned out!

Rúgbrauð

Adapted from Almar Grímsson’s recipe,

with help from Nanna Rögnvaldardóttir’s Icelandic Food and Cookery

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Ingredients:

2 cups rye flour

2 cups whole wheat flour

2 cups white flour

3 tsp. active dry yeast

2 tsp. salt

2 tsp. baking soda

1 ½ cups molasses

4 cups buttermilk

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Directions:

Preheat oven to 350-375 (I did about 360).

Proof the yeast by adding it to 1/3 cup warm water and 1 tsp. white sugar. Stir until dissolved, then let sit about 10 minutes or until frothy.

Stir together flours, salt, and baking soda; set aside.

Blend together molasses and buttermilk; add yeast mixture and stir.

Gradually add dry ingredients to the buttermilk mixture, blending well by hand or with a stand mixer. Mixture will be fairly thin, more like a cake batter than a bread dough.

Pour batter into lightly greased pan(s). Find a large baking dish with sides at least 2 inches high that your pans will fit in (I used a 9×13). Place your pans in the large baking dish and put it in the oven. Use a pitcher or measuring glass to fill the baking dish about half full of water.

Bake, uncovered, for about an hour or until a knife inserted in the middle comes out clean. Run a knife around the edges to loosen, let sit for just a couple minutes, then turn over onto a cooling rack.

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Note: this is the first time I made rúgbrauð, and it was a bit of an experiment, having to combine ingredients from one recipe with directions from another, but what I’ve written here is what I did and it turned out quite well. Playing around with the baking method and temperature may improve the results. I cut the above recipe in half and ended up with two short loaves (I filled two large loaf pans half-full); a full recipe would probably make 4 short loaves or 2 full ones.

Thoughts?

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