Flatey, Part 2

Flatey: The Rest of the Story

I already wrote about most of our Flatey trip, but there are a few more pictures and stories about that day that I want to share.

First of all, when we boarded the ferry, Hrafnhildur asked me if I was going to get seasick.  I assured her that I am quite used to ferry rides (in the summer anyway) and would be just fine.  It was a clear, calm day and I was indeed just fine.  Apparently in the winter they often have to cancel the crossing due to bad weather.  It’s a fairly small boat… not sure about the vehicle capacity, but there’s a little galley with ridiculously overpriced food, plus a nifty little theater where they show movies (there was some oldie on starring Mel Gibson).  Kind of a nice idea for winter crossings, or for people who ride the ferry all the time, but I wasn’t about to waste my time watching Mel Gibson when I could be enjoying the scenery.

Skipping ahead to Flatey, let’s recap: we perused the fish-factory-turned-giftshop by the dock, walked into Þorpið (the village), said ‘góðan daginn’ to all the summer residents who were out painting their houses, listened in on choir practice at the church, had kaffi at Hotel Flatey, and enjoyed the constantly beautiful view.  Eventually we ran out of things to do, so we lingered by the hotel for awhile and watched kids jumping into the water, then meandered back to the dock and sat in the sun while we waited for the ferry to return.

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Flatey Scenes:

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Sheep! I took this photo just for my mama, who has an inexplicable obsession with pictures of farm animals, specifically sheep and chickens.

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These contraptions are all over the place. They’re for hanging fish to dry. Why anyone would want to ruin a perfectly good fish by drying it for 6 weeks until it looks and tastes like fishy straw is beyond me, but it seems very popular.

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Flateyan Goods

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Enjoying the sun and waiting for the ferry

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The ferry arriving to take us home

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Homeward bound

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On the ride back, I once again stayed above deck the whole time.  This time Sæmundur and Hrafnhildur joined me, and Sæmundur tried to locate Skáleyar, the islands where some of my ancestors lived.

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Looking for Skáleyar

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We ate pizza at a little restaurant back on the mainland, and I eavesdropped on the conversation of some English-speaking tourists sitting behind us.

On the drive home, Sæmundur suddenly pulled over.  He wanted to show me the area where my great-great-grandfather’s farm was.  First he showed me Neðri-Arnórsstaðir, but then right across the street we discovered a sign for Miðhlíð, the actual name of the actual farm where my great-grandfather was born (and I think where he lived until he left for America at the age of 9 or 10).  I don’t know if the land boundaries are the same as they used to be, but in any case, he was born in this area and enjoyed this incredible view of Snæfellsness.  Impossible to really wrap my head around, but incredible nonetheless.  I would have loved to be able to talk to the people who live on the farm now and see what they know about its history.

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Neðri-Arnórsstaðir

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The sign for Miðhlíð, the farm where my great-grandfather was born.

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Not a bad place to live, eh?

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My ancestors had to suffer this terrible view.

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We had to take Astrós back home to Tálknafjörður, so we enjoyed some heitt súkkulaði out on the deck and then her younger sisters said ‘komdu!’ and invited me to jump on the trampoline with them. The language barrier didn’t matter too much. We just jumped and jumped and laughed and laughed.

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This morning Hrafnhildur and Sæmundur showed me a book with information about farms and towns in the area and the people who lived there in the past century.

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Here’s the page about Miðhlíð:

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Miðhlíð

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Patro, circa 1913

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I can’t wrap my head around the fact that I am walking on the same land as my ancestors did, seeing the same views of the same impossibly beautiful land, but it’s true.  Hey Mom, have I convinced you that you need to come yet?  :)

One thought on “Flatey, Part 2

  1. Pingback: mæðgur á ferðalagi: frá Stykkishólmi til Patreksfjarðar | Iceland Bound

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